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Red Mill / Englander's Mill
New Castle Co. | Delaware | USA | c. 1789
Township: White Clay Creek Hundred | Watersource: White Clay Creek.



Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

John England purchased a 600 acre tract on the north side of White Clay Creek near Muddy Run in 1726. He reputedly built the first grist mill and dam on this site. Following England's death, his brother Joseph, acquired the land.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Historic American Buildings Survey submitte by Ted Hazen 10/30/2009

Historic American Buildings Survey, W. S. Stewart, Photographer. May 6, 1937, Library of Congress. John England's Grist Mill, 81 Red Mill Road, Ogletown vicinity, New Castle County,Delaware. 1789 initial construction. GPS: 75' 42.30W, 39' 44.35N

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Ben Adams

The Wilson House

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

Joseph's grandson, Joseph III, acquired the property in 1791. A tax assessment from 1804 listed Joseph England III, as the proprietor of one merchant mill and one saw mill. The England family would hold onto the property until 1839, when it was sold to David Eastburn, who sold the mill and 17 acres in 1870.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

The mill consists of 2 distinct sections. The oldest section, which is lower in height, dates to 1789, according to an inscription in the fieldstone foundation. It features hand-hewn timber framing and tongue-and-groove siding attached by cut nails.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

The newer, taller section of the building sits over the millrace. It was constructed c. 1887 by Thomas W. Jones. Jones retrofitted the mill, replacing the millwheels with rollers and the waterwheel with a more efficient turbine. Jones sold the mill in 1888.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Ben Adams

A view from the head race overflow

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

The Eastburn family eventually regained possession. In 1925, the mill became the property of Frank Buckingham. The Buckingham family operated the mill until about 1965, grinding corn, oats, and wheat.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

According to one historical account Red Mill originally had an 18 horsepower undershot waterwheel, and grains were ground by one set of burr millstones. They were replaced in 1887 by a water turbine and rollers.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Ben Adams

The mill race viewed from behind the mill.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

The remaining milling equipment dates from this later period, although the rollers have been replaced with millstones. Of particular interest is the millstone hoist or crane that is made of wrought iron instead of wood.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

David Eastburn was Red Mill's owner until 1870, after which the mill was operated by Joseph Oliver and Charles Allen. At that time, Red Mill was one of four flour and feed mills in Mill Creek Hundred. The mill employed one hand, who was paid $300 per year.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

The mill ground wheat, other grain and grist into flour and feed, and had a total capacity of 20 barrels per day. When retrofitted in 1887, power and capacity reportedly doubled. England House, the owner's house, was built in the early 1800's, using some Flemish bond brick, by Joseph England III.

Red Mill / Englander's Mill
Picture: Robert T. Kinsey 07/19/2009

Wilson House was the Red Mill miller's house. Rathnell Wilson began construction of the frame Wilson House in 1876. The date is etched into the plaster of the basement wall. It was the residence of Red Mill's millers from c. 1876 to c. 1965.

Directions: This mill is located on the north side of the creek, on Old Red Mill Road, which is on the east side of Red Mill Rd., between Rtes. 2 and 273. Old Red Mill Rd. is a small road that dead-ends at the mill.
 
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